Blog

  1. Pflanzanleitung Sterndolden

    Wie pflanzt man Sterndolden (Astrantia)Sterndolden sind hübsche, üppige, winterharte Stauden. Die Nadelkissen artigen Blüten werden von bestäubenden Insekten geliebt. Trotz ihres zierlich hübschen Aussehens sind Astrantien unglaublich zähe und widerstandsfähige Pflanzen und Sie gedeihen gut in fast allen Gärten.Dieser Garten Favorit macht Read more...
  2. How to deter badgers from eating your bulbs


    There be three Badgers on a mossy stone
    Beside a dark and covered way:
    Each dreams himself a monarch on his throne,
    And so they stay and stay

    - Lewis Carroll

    … and stay to eat your spring bulbs! What can you do to stop your spring garden from disappearing before your bulbs have barely even had a chance to settle in the soil?

    Even though they may wreck your carefully planted bulbs, remember that badgers are a protected species. And with good reason! They are excellent home builders and their burrows or setts can survive for centuries, housing several generations. Badgers are very house-proud too! They won’t bring food inside or use any part of it as a toilet. They will repeatedly change their bedding to prevent the build-up of fleas and lice. Not only that, but they are a bit of a cultural icon too, featuring in the Beatrix Potter stories, ‘The Wind in The Willows’ and even made it as the symbol of Hufflepuff house from the Harry Potter series!

    But they do love a bulb or two! Here are some ways that might deter them:

    • One of the best options to stop badgers digging is to get some thick wire grid (e.g. weld mesh from a builders’ yard), cut it to size and place just beneath the soil surface. Plants will grow through the grid, but the badgers cannot dig through it and it can be removed for weeding and composting.

    • Similarly, put branches of prickly holly all over the surface of a bed planted with tulips. May help to keep the paws away, but when the tulips shoot up, the holly will have to be removed.

    • You could try an ultrasonic animal deterrent device. These use strong ultrasonic dual signals which frighten animals and ensure they do not get used to the sound due to the intermittent signals it sends out when activated.  These signals, coupled with the strong flashing light, may be enough to make any pest running for cover.

    • Get some help from a friend! Human male pee can deter and will put off badgers as they are very territorial. Dilute it with water in a 1:4 ratio and use a sprayer or a water can to apply. (This way it will smell less and it will still serve the purpose). Although heavy rain may wash it away.

    • Scotch bonnet chilli peppers might do the trick too. Badgers don’t see very well, so they are reliant on their sense of smell. If they detect something as irritating to the nose as these chilli peppers, they will have no choice but to retreat. Crush the peppers until fine and sprinkle them at where you think the badgers are entering or around the boundary. (Be careful though, these peppers are VERY hot, so don’t touch your face after handling them). Again, rain or heavy winds may wash or blow the peppers away.

    To prevent other animals, like rodents or deer from snacking on your bulbs, consider our animal-resistant varieties. You can find them on our website by applying the Animal Resistant filter under Special Features or by clicking here.

    Read more...
  3. How to plant syringas

    Syringas or lilacs are charming, vigorous shrubs producing dense clusters of scented flowers and pretty heart-shaped leaves. Undemanding and easy-to-grow, these timeless beauties will add a touch of nostalgia to the herbaceous border and will attract pollinating insects to the garden. Plant en masse or try mixing with buddlejas. They make good cut Read more...
  4. How to plant liatrises

    Liatrises or blazing stars produce spectacular, feathery spikes of tubular flowers above compact tufts of lance-shaped leaves on stiff stems. Loved by pollinating insects, these impressive perennials will add a touch of pizzazz to the herbaceous border or wild garden. Plant en masse or try mixing with achilleas, aconites, Japanese anemones or Read more...
  5. How to plant loniceras

    Loniceras or honeysuckles are undemanding, vigorous shrubs producing delightfully scented blooms that are often followed by small round berries in the summer. Extremely versatile, they can be used as ground cover, hedging plants or can be trained against a wall. Plant in fertile, humus-rich soil, moist but well-drained soil in sun. Apply a Read more...
  6. How to plant leucanthemums

    Leucanthemum or Shasta daisies produce beautiful daisy-type flowers from June to September. Easy-to-grow and excellent value for money, these wonderful perennials loved by pollinating insects will bring a charm of their own to the garden border. Try mixing with achilleas, lavenders and nepetas. Alternatively, interlace with lime green/grey Read more...
  7. How to plant jasiones

    Jasiones or sheep's bits produce bright scabious-like flowers on tall slender stems above dense foliage. Native to temperate Europe and the Mediterranean, these lovely perennials loved by pollinating insects will equally be at home in the rockery, wild garden or front/middle of the border. Try mixing with campanulas and scabiosas or interlace with Read more...
  8. How to plant dichelostemmas

    Dichelostemmas or brevoortias are fantastic perennials native to Northwestern United States producing clusters of tubular to bell-shaped flowers held on slender stems above grass-like foliage. Try mixing with narcissi and tulips in the wild or meadow garden. Plant around 10 cm deep in well-drained soil in full sun. Always unpack on arrival and Read more...
  9. How to plant buxus

    Buxus or boxwoods are wondeful evergreen shrubs popularly used as ground cover or hedging plants. They are great companions to achilleas, asters and cosmoses. Plant in any fertile, well-drained soil. They prefer partial shade, but will tolerate full sun. Keep trimmed in summer. Always unpack and store in a cool place until ready to plant. Take Read more...
  10. How to plant alliums Sphaerocephalon (drumsticks)

    Also known as round-headed leeks or drumstick alliums, alliums Sphaerocephalon produce umbells of small round to egg-shaped flowers that will start off green before slowly turning reddish-purple from the top down as they age. Plant densely in the border or meadow to create an eye-catching display. Alternatively, try interlacing with grasses. Plant Read more...

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